Like Matthew, Luke, and John, the Gospel of Mark doesn’t include the name of its author. However, the universal testimony of the early church confirms that it was penned by John Mark, who served the church in Rome alongside Peter. Colossians 4:10 tells us that he was a cousin of Barnabas, and we also know from Scripture that his mother’s home in Jerusalem served as a gathering place for the early church. As a young man, John Mark accompanied Paul and Barnabas on their first missionary journey. However, Acts 13:13 tells us that Mark deserted them at Perga in Pamphylia. As a result, Paul refused to take him on subsequent trips, sparking a sharp disagreement between Paul and Barnabas. Although he had betrayed Paul’s trust, John Mark later became a valued member of Paul’s ministry team. In Colossians 4:10-11, Paul instructs his readers to welcome Mark as one of his “fellow workers for the kingdom” who had proven “to be an encouragement” to him during his first Roman imprisonment. Some years later, near the end of his life, Paul instructs Timothy in 2 Timothy 4:11, to “pick up Mark and bring him with you, for he is useful to me for service”

It’s likely that John Mark was restored to ministry, at least in part, through the mentorship of Peter, who became something of a spiritual father to him, referring to Mark in 1 Peter 5:13 as “my son.” If anyone understood the process of restoration after failure, it was Peter, who was graciously restored by Jesus after denying him three times. Peter’s influence undoubtedly helped Mark overcome the weaknesses of his youth so that he could faithfully accomplish what God had called him to do. Papias, the early church father writes:

“Mark having become the interpreter of Peter wrote down accurately whatsoever he remembered… Although he neither heard the Lord nor accompanied him, Mark was intent on just one purpose: to leave out nothing that he heard or to include any falsehood among them…”

Most scholars agree that Mark recorded the substance of Peter’s teaching about the life and ministry of Jesus, which became the first of the gospels, either while accompanying Peter in Rome in the 50’s AD or shortly after Peter’s martyrdom between 67 and 68 AD. Matthew and Luke begin with the announcement and the narrative of the birth of Jesus. Matthew’s gospel has a genealogy that connects Jesus to His ancestor, Abraham. And in Luke’s gospel, the genealogy goes back even further–all the way to Adam. John also begins his gospel account with a sort of genealogy that traces Jesus’ family history even further back into eternity. However, Mark’s gospel doesn’t begin with a birth narrative or a genealogy, but rather with Jesus’ baptism and the start of His public ministry. Right from the outset Mark is clear about his reason for writing; “The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.” In fact, Mark’s gospel seeks to answer one question: “Who is Jesus Christ?” This theme will reach its climax half way through his 16 chapter narrative in 8:29, when Peter responds to Jesus’ question; “Who do you say that I am,” by triumphantly declaring; “You are the Christ.” This confession marks the high point of Mark’s gospel. The preceding narrative builds up to it and the subsequent narrative flows from and continues to build on it. The first eight chapters demonstrate that Jesus is the Christ on the basis of His authoritative words and miraculous deeds; and the final eight chapters on the basis of His sacrificial death and glorious resurrection. From beginning to end, everything centres on the foundational truth that Peter proclaimed: Jesus is the Christ, that is, the long-awaited Messiah, promised in Scripture. He’s the Son of God and the Saviour of the world.

One thing you pick up on right at the beginning of the gospel, and which is characteristic of Mark’s style, is that he likes to get to the point. And so, his gospel is a very pithy, direct, almost urgent account of the life of Jesus. Mark moves quickly through much of Jesus’ ministry, using the word “immediately” more than the other three gospel writers combined. Consequently, Mark often leaves out the lengthy discourses included in the other gospels and gives only short excerpts. Unlike Matthew’s gospel, which addressed a Jewish audience, or Luke’s gospel, which was composed for a specific individual, named Theophilus; Mark was written for Gentile believers in Rome. We know this because Mark often translates Aramaic terms; provides explanations for Jewish customs; omits certain elements of particular interest to Jewish readers, like Jesus’ genealogy; includes fewer OT references; and calculates time according to the Roman system. Mark also incorporates Latin expressions in place of their Greek equivalents. As a divinely inspired and accurate historical record of the life and ministry of the Lord Jesus, Mark’s gospel has remained a profound blessing to countless Christians throughout the ages and a powerful witness to the unbelieving world.

SERMONS

Sermon:  A Voice in the Wilderness

Preacher:  The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date:  Sunday, June 6, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 1:1-8

Sermon:  The Baptism of Jesus

Preacher:  The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date:  Sunday, June 13, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 1:9-13

Sermon:  The King & His Kingdom

Preacher:  The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date:  Sunday, June 20, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 1:14-28

Sermon:  The Lord & The Leper

Preacher:  The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date:  Sunday, June 27, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 1:32-45

Handout:  1.32-45 HO

Sermon:  A Damaged Roof & Forgiven of Sins

Preacher:  The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date:  Sunday, July 4, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 2:1-12

Handout:  2.1-12 HO

Sermon:  Of Controversies & the King(dom)

Preacher:  Simon Teague

Date:  Sunday, July 11, 2021

Scripture: Mark 2:13-3:6

Sermon:  Jesus’ Authority Questioned

Preacher:  Simon Teague

Date:  Sunday, July 18, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 3:20-35

Sermon:  The Seed & The Soils

Preacher:  The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date:  Sunday, July 25, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 4:1-20

Handout:  4.1-20 HO

Sermon:  Fruitful Hearers

Preacher:  The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date:  Sunday, August 1, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 4:21-34

Handout:  4.21-34 HO

Sermon: A Tale of Two Fears

Preacher: The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date: Sunday August 8, 2021

Scripture: Mark 4:35-41

Sermon:  Of Spirits, Swine & The Stronger Man

Preacher:  Simon Teague

Date:  Sunday, August 15, 2021

Scripture: Mark 5:1-20

Sermon:  The Power & Pity of Jesus

Preacher:  The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date:  Sunday, August 22, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 5:21-43

Handout : 5.21-43 HO

Sermon: Amazing Unbelief

Preacher: The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date: Sunday August 29, 2021

Scripture: Mark 6:1-6

Handout: 6.1-6 HO

Sermon: Ordinary Men – Extraordinary Calling

Preacher: The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date: Sunday September 5, 2021

Scripture: Mark 6:7-13

Handout: 6.7-13 HO

Sermon:  The Death of John the Baptist

Preacher:  The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering.

Date:  Sunday, September 12, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 6:14-29

Handout:  6.14-29 HO

Sermon:  The Feeding of the 5000: Of the True Shephard & Bread From Heaven

Preacher:  Simon Teague

Date:  Sunday, September 19, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 6:30-44

Sermon: Do Not Be Afraid, It Is I

Preacher: The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date: September 26, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 6:45-52

Handout:  6.45-52 HO

Sermon:  Clean On the Inside

Preacher:  The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date:  Sunday, October 3, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 7:1-23

Handout:  7.1-23 HO

Sermon:  Great Faith

Preacher:  The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date: Sunday, October 17, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 7:24-30

Handout:  7.24-30 HO

Sermon:  To Speak Or Not To Speak

Preacher:  The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date: Sunday, October 24, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 7:31-39

Handout:  7.31-39 HO

Sermon:  Spiritual Blindness

Preacher: The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date: Sunday, October 31, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 8:11-26

Handout:  8.11-26 HO

Sermon:  Who do you say that I am?

Preacher: The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date: Sunday, November 7, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 8:27-33

Handout:  8.27-33 HO`

Sermon:  Who do you say that I am?

Preacher: The Rev. Canon Christopher Doering

Date: Sunday, November 7, 2021

Scripture:  Mark 8:34-38

Handout:  8.34-38 HO